I love to write postcards. I write tons of postcards wherever I travel. I annoy my friends and family with postcards, and even send one to Mr. Panda although we travel together and I know he will not even read it. Now, thanks to a clever marketing agency I can even send postcards from the future – at Victoria Peak in Hong Kong!

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Victoria peak is one of the most famous sightseeing places in Hong Kong. And since summer 2012, 365 new mailboxes can be found at the basement level of The Peak mall – one for every day of the year. But what to do with so many mailboxes in one space? Of course they are to be used to send a postcard from the future. All postboxes are labeled with one day of the year. You simply have to deposit your postcard to the mailbox on which day you want your card to be sent.

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So how does it work to send postcard from the future? They provide you a board with detailed information in English and Cantonese as well as a map with even more detailed information.

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  1. You can only send postcards with a maximum size of 180x140mm and less than 30g. You can either buy different tourist postcards at one of the nearby souvenir shops or bring them with you.
  2. Write your message, name and mailing address of the receiver as well as “BY AIRMAIL” on the card. If you bring cards you can already prepare them at home.
  3. Check the correct amount of postage as well as the delivery days on the provided list.
  4. Affix sufficient stamps on your postcards. You can either buy stamps at the post office at the Peak (check the opening hours) or bring them with you. Be careful, the amount depends on the country, and there are not 2 but 3 different Zones since February 2016!
  5. Post your cards to the correct mailboxes. For example, if you want your card to arrive on May 15th (Mother’s Day in Austria), and it approximately takes 5 days to Austria, post your card at least on May 10th.

By the way, if you purchase something at the peak for 100 HK$ or more at one of the shops, you will receive a few  “The Peak I Love You” limited edition postcards at The Peak service counter where they sell tickets for the observation deck. Just show your receipt to one of the employees. I showed them two receipts at different times, and first got 6, then 4 The Peak postcards.

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This time I have/will send postcards to my parents, one for my mom for Mother’s Day in May, and one to my father for Father’s Day in June. I am really looking forward to their surprised faces when they will receive a card from Hong Kong when I am obviously back home.

Do you like to send postcards? Will you send one from the future next time you visit The Peak?

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365 days of I LOVE YOU – ‘Post Love to the Future’ with a postcard @ The Peak in Hong Kong
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19 thoughts on “365 days of I LOVE YOU – ‘Post Love to the Future’ with a postcard @ The Peak in Hong Kong

  • April 6, 2016 at 2:00
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    What a lovely idea. Ps really live the view fr the Peak and the little train to take you there.

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    • April 6, 2016 at 10:52
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      The view sure is great. I love the dark feeling of when it becomes dusk and the skyline slowly lights up.

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  • April 6, 2016 at 2:47
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    I thought I saw that at on of the stalls in Sai Kung weekend market. I didn’t think about it too much then cos I was on my way to the sports centre. It sounds like a lovely idea though, although the one in Sai Kung didn’t have an elaborate set up like the one at the Peak.

    Anyway, I swear postcards take longer to send than regular letters. The postmen must read them on the way. 🙂

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    • April 6, 2016 at 10:56
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      I’ve also hearg about mailmen reading postcards in HK from my friends that send a lot.
      They take so freaking long sometimes, almost a month. Too long for a mere postcard, I am back home earlier.

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  • April 6, 2016 at 11:57
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    I love sending postcards! Although I don’t do it often nowadays, I did it a lot when I was younger. I also have a nice collection of postcards, some I bought myself and others I received from friends or family.

    I once sent myself a postcard from the office of Santa Claus in Finland because they said it would be stamped with a special Santa Claus stamp. Well it has been 11 years and I haven’t received it yet. Damn you, Santa Claus’ helpers!

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    • April 6, 2016 at 13:30
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      I have tons of postcars from all over the world. I often trade blank postcards with friends to write them later and am an active Postcrosser. 🙂
      (Yes, I am not only a crazy cat lady but a postcard lover as well 🙁 )

      Unfortunately so many postcards get lost along their travel, I also have some who where missend to Australia, and one was even missend to Taipei. One even showed up after 5 years. Maybe your case will turn out like one of these you can read in the newspaper about sometimes – your letter will show up after 50 years. 😀

      Reply
  • April 6, 2016 at 18:01
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    That sounds amazing! There’s also a site that lets you send emails to the future. I used it a couple of times and it’s pretty awesome.

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    • April 7, 2016 at 13:25
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      Haha people have the funniest idea. I think the concept of ‘time capsules’ is so interesting.

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  • April 6, 2016 at 18:20
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    Interesting! I visited Victoria Peak in HK back around Christmas in 2012 but I did not see the store. Perhaps because I was not looking too hard. That is one of the reasons I follow the posts of you and Lina (www.myhongkonghusband.com) because both of you frequently report about what happened in HK when you visited the place. I like to look at the pictures that you and Lina post. Keep up the good work! Ex-Hong Kongers like me need the posts of you and Lina.

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    • April 7, 2016 at 13:27
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      Thank you. But unfortunately Lina and I do not live in HK. We do research a lot on the internet, and as for me, I probably know more about what’s going on in HK and Tokyo as in Vienna. I only know where I can get good food here haha. 😀

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      • April 7, 2016 at 19:20
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        Knowing where to get good food in where you live is very important too. Regarding which restaurants to get good food in HK, I am sure Mr. Panda can help you. Next time you visit HK, you can research online on the HK restaurants rated by Michelin, which in the last couple of years tended to concentrate on a number of small eateries with distinctive “street food items” or local food that is not fancy. Mr. Panda can probably tell you where they are and tell you the Chinese names. I read about them in online newspapers published in HK. Trying to locate the restaurants with the English names may not be easy. For one thing, the locals most likely would not know the restaurants by the English names. I sometime wonder how the expats in HK find these restaurants. But then may be most expats would not care about the food items with distinctive local flavors. The locals would not mind because these places are usually packed with locals, so the locals would rather that the expats don’t patronize these places. Not too many expats are like you and Lina who enjoy crossing the invisible social boundary to try local food that Mr. Panda and Sing like now, or ate when they were children growing up in HK. I bet they became nostalgic when they saw those street food during their visits of HK. I certainly would.

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        • April 8, 2016 at 12:49
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          I think it is a problem that there are 2 different name for all places, a Cantonese one and an English one. I try to learn the Cantonese ones from the very beginning, so when I ask friends or relatives for help they’ll actually know what I am talking about.
          As Mr. Panda already moved to Vienna years ago, many stores already closed down (zap choo lap la, as he always says). Therefore we try to research good restaurants online, like on local blogs or so. The problem with Michelin reviewed restaurants is, that there are sometimes too many tourists there.

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          • April 11, 2016 at 13:57
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            I can certainly see Mr. Panda’s sentiment. Yes, many cafes and restaurants have closed down over the years and in particular the last few year due to the sky rocket rents. We live in Tai Wai, which is considered as one of the paradise for foodies. Every 3-6 months, there would at least one local cafe close down or change hands.

            Definitely if you and Mr Panda come over again, we shall take you to some yummy places. 🙂 I do agree with you that Muchelin star place can be way too busy – food / service may not be the best in my opinion.

          • April 25, 2016 at 21:26
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            Betty: You are smart to remember the restaurant names in Cantonese. Then you can ask the HK friends or relatives of Mr. Panda whether the restaurants still exist, and to learn new ones. Those places close down and pop up here and there. That’s what I do. I think consulting with Phil should also help. By the way, I hope your Chinese father-in-law is healthy in HK. What I am concerned about is that he would not seek medical help because he might think that it is too costly. But if he still has his HK Identification Card he could get very good medical care at a low cost in public hospitals if he does not mind waiting in the hospital’s waiting room.

            Phil: I used to live in Shatin which is not that far from Tai Wai. I did not know Tai Wai has become a place for foodies (sort of like Kowloon City in the past?). About 4 years ago, a relative took me to a restaurant by the road side very near a bus terminal. They were famous for rice porridge. But I forgot the name. Next time before I go back to HK, I will look you up at your website to see what recommendations you could give me.

          • April 26, 2016 at 12:21
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            And thanks to the internet, I can also walk around and find my way alone too. 🙂

  • April 9, 2016 at 20:27
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    I ain’t good with sending postcards, too lazy I guess. Only for Christmas I make some cards and send them to family and few friends but nothing more than that.

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  • May 1, 2016 at 18:45
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    Postcards from the future are an awesome idea! I would love to do that at any place I visited. Sometimes, I buy postcards, but don’t send them until when I come back home because I can’t get to the post office. I’d like to be able to send them right away! I think Victoria Peak also looks like a great spot to visit.

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    • May 1, 2016 at 19:21
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      I always send postcards from the place of origin – as a postcard collector, it is a must. Although it is really complicated sometimes. I look up online for where the closest post office is and try to buy stamps as soon as possible. I prepare addresses and non-German/English postcard texts (for Japanese friends and Cantonese speaking MIL) at home already so I can just copy them. And I try to write them in the first few days because experience has shown that I always run out of time in the end haha. Just like for the Peak cards: I try to prepare them before going up.

      Reply

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