I have always colored eggs with my mom around Easter when I was little, and I was also forced to blow out and paint some eggs in kindergarten every year. After all the resentfulness finally faded away last year, I decided to revive this particular childhood memory of mine and tried to decorate a few blown out eggs for Easter. Of course my interests changed over the last 20 years as well as my manual skills. I got interested in East Asian cultures and got better at handicraft work. The result of both changes were colorful Easter eggs with Chinese characters on them.

Traditional Austrian Easter Decoration
Traditional Austrian Easter Decoration: Easter bush

Easter is the second most important festival in Austria. Maybe because many of the younger people do not know about the religious meaning anymore, it became more of a capitalist family feast. But anyway, we still like to celebrate it as ‘back then’ with my parents. Apart from all the traditions existing in the part of Austria where I grew up, my mom likes to decorate their house with all the traditional small stuff she collected over the last decades. One of her favorites is the socalled “Osterstrauch” (lit. Easter bush), which are a few pussy willow twigs with beautifully decorated eggs hanging on it. Most of the eggs were done by my grandma, some were bought, and a few were made by me.

While I am normally too lazy to redecorate our apartment for every different occasion, I at least wanted to contribute a little “Hong Kongness” to my parent’s place. And how did it turn out?

 

Colored Easter eggs saying "Spring"
Colored Easter eggs saying “Spring”

It is actually pretty easy to make them by yourself:

  1. Blow out a few eggs. I start with a small needle and then use a small rasp to drill a small and even hole at both sides. Wash them and let them dry completely. I always use organic free-range eggs and cook pancakes afterwards.
  2. Put them on a wooden stick (I use the ones you can buy at the supermarket to put meat on) and color them evenly with a suitable paint, e.g. acrylic paint or nail polish. Let the paint dry completely.
  3. Write the prefered Chinese charakter on it. (I recommend you to practice on paper first.)
  4. Finish it with spraying clear coat on it and let it completely dry again.
  5. Afterwards decorate it as suited. Put it on a wooden stick or hang it on twigs like my mom did.

 

Do you also like to mix certain things from different cultures? Do you think it is inappropriate? Have you done something similar before? I would love to hear your stories.

Austrian-Hong Kong Spring Inspired Easter Egg Decoration

16 thoughts on “Austrian-Hong Kong Spring Inspired Easter Egg Decoration

  • March 3, 2016 at 1:01
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    Those are really pretty! Nice brushwork. I never thought of doing Chinese characters. Maybe that would appeal to Andy. But probably not. He’s not a holiday type of guy.

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    • March 3, 2016 at 1:03
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      I am sure that Mr. Panda didn’t even notice when I did them, although I blocked the whole kitchen table for a few days. I always show them the stuff I make and I think that he just tells me he likes them to make me feel loved. But he most probably doesn’t care at all. 🙁

      Reply
    • March 3, 2016 at 9:43
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      Thank you! I know how to write Chinese characters quite well, but calligraphy is another level.

      Reply
  • March 3, 2016 at 20:47
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    We/ my parents also have the Osterstrauch each year. The past two years it has been “canceled” because of unpredictable Nathan but this year we might have some again. Need to force my wife to paint some eggs as well 🙂

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    • March 3, 2016 at 21:34
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      Well yeah a little child is somewhat like Godzilla in the world of decorations, as well as cats. 😀

      Reply
  • March 3, 2016 at 23:46
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    Omg I love it! I think the ‘chun’ (spring) on there is very fitting. Your hanzi look really great!

    You make it sound easy but cleaning out an egg, drilling a hole in it and then place it on a stick sounds really tough!

    Happy Easter!

    Reply
    • March 4, 2016 at 10:24
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      Thank you and happy Easter!
      I think it was quite a challange to write on an egg. The last time I colored eggs I was still too young to write.
      And blowing them out was really easy. I just use the smallest round rasp availabe at my DIY store and drilled perfectly round holes after I made small ones with a needle. And after doing a whole pack, everyone will be a pro. 😀

      Reply
  • March 4, 2016 at 4:01
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    What a cute idea to put a Chinese spin on an Easter tradition. I love how you painted the eggs, included the Chinese character for spring, and added flowers. They are just gorgeous.

    I haven’t painted Easter eggs in years, but maybe in the years to come I will revive the tradition as well.

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    • March 4, 2016 at 10:28
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      Thank you so much! I actually bought the flowers a few years ago and never had a chance to use them. But it looks like they are perfect for Easter/Spring eggs. 🙂
      If you decide to make some, please show me a photo.

      Reply
  • March 7, 2016 at 12:53
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    Your handiwork look really nice. I wouldn’t have the patient to make them. I love the fact that you put in some oriental twist to them. It made them special.

    On another note, Hayley and I love to mix our culture together. We have had little Chinese lanterns on our Christmas tree, Santa shaped chocolate for Lunar new year.

    Of course, as a challenge, we adapted the famous poem of ‘Twas the night before Christmas into ’twas the night before Chinese new year, with god of fortune delivering the Lai See.

    https://globetrottingadventurer.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/twas-the-night-before-chinese-new-year/

    Reply
    • March 7, 2016 at 16:09
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      Thanks! I have Panda-Santa ornaments for our Christmas tree, and two years ago we also had Chinese sweets on it. I like the lantern idea a lot, I’ll look into it for next Christmas.

      I was already thinking about little lucky charms for CNY. In Austria we hand out little pigs, so I’ll do so when the year of the pig comes. And I made Origami lucky charms before too.

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      • March 10, 2016 at 5:52
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        Yeah, the mini-lanterns were what we had for decorations of our wedding venue. Might as well put them into good use afterwards.

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  • March 11, 2016 at 21:26
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    AAAHH!>_< I like them SO much! This is such a great idea. Since I'm moving to back to China March 29 I don't have time with all the packing and such, but definitely a must next year! Thanks for sharing :)!

    Reply
    • March 11, 2016 at 22:28
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      Thank you. 🙂
      Packing for moving is too much work, but you can start early when you settle down in China. Life is so busy, so you might miss next year too. Do it like me and start to prepare them right after Christmas. And I start with Christmas stuff already in September. 😀

      Reply
  • Pingback: Celebrating Easter with a Hong Konger in Carinthia, Southern Austria | Betty 有一​個​熊貓 | HAS A PANDA

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